"I’m thrilled to be launching a new chapter for this well-loved local landmark"

In January 2016, Jack Greenall became The Pheasant’s new landlord, and set about launching a new chapter for this well-loved local landmark. Jack’s family has a passion for brewing and managing pubs and hotels that dates back to the 1750s and, having trained with the fastest-growing country pub group in the south of England, Jack was thrilled to launch his own innkeeping career with a top-to-bottom restoration that both honours The Pheasant’s heritage and ushers in a new generation of epicurean pleasures.

A sensitive refurbishment has brought the bar and restaurant a new, relaxed elegance with rich colours, comfortable furnishings and atmospheric lighting. And whether you pull up a vintage leather bar stool, hunker down in our cosy snug with its quirky print gallery and bespoke selection of local and general interest books or join friends at a table in the main dining space, it’s a great place to sample our broad and imaginative drinks range and regularly changing menu, which showcases the freshest and best local produce and unfussy, flavoursome cooking.

Rooms & Surrounding Area

The Pheasant’s 11 guest rooms too have been transformed, with an eclectic but sleek mix of patterns, textures and tones that give each bedroom a completely unique, contemporary look featuring hand-picked artworks, fabrics and furniture and meticulous attention to detail.

Set among the scenic rolling fields of Berkshire’s chalk downlands, just minutes from Britain’s jumps racing capital Lambourn and the antiques Mecca of Hungerford, the independent pub, halfway between Wales and London and just off the M4, is ideally placed for exploring an area packed with attractions and activities.

The stunning market town of Marlborough lies just 13 miles to the west, Highclere Castle, location for TV’s Downton Abbey, can be reached in 20 minutes, and we’re on the edge of the North Wessex Downs, a designated area of outstanding natural beauty and a wonderland for walkers.

Our scenic corner of Berkshire is rich in attractions to discover and activities to enjoy. Listed below are some of our favourites...


Marlborough

Marlborough is a charming historic market town just 13 miles away across the county border in Wiltshire. Sitting on the River Kennet and boasting one of the widest high streets in England, the town is home to a unique mix of quaint architectural styles, from half-timbered cottages to ornate red-brick mansion houses to the handsome stone churches at each end of the main street. Host to a bustling market every Wednesday and Saturday, the town offers a wealth of stylish boutiques and chic cafes and bistros.

marlboroughwiltshire.co.uk


Hungerford

Another historic market town, characterised by handsome Georgian architecture, Hungerford is best known today as a thriving hub for antique shops and fairs. Just four miles from us, it is also home to several authentic country outfitters, and is a good embarkation point for narrowboat trips along the Kennet and Avon Canal.

hungerford.co.uk


Highclere Castle

A loved local landmark whose fame went global with its casting as the titular mansion in TV’s Downton Abbey, the Victorian-era Highclere Castle is set in 1,000 acres of sweeping Hampshire parkland designed by the renowned 18th-century landscape gardener Capability Brown. Exhibitions, charming follies, lakes and many of the grand rooms seen in the TV show are just some of the features of the Earl and Countess of Carnarvon’s home, which is open to the public for 60 to 70 days of the year.

highclerecastle.co.uk


Welford Park

Welford Park, known for its Queen Anne house, is also famous for its snowdrops. The Galanthus Nivalis (snowdrop) display at Welford Park is in a beech wood covering approximately 5 acres alongside the River Lambourn. In the formal gardens to the south of the house you can view some of the rarer species from Lord Monstictus, green tips, Lady Elphinstone, John Gray and many more. It is believed that the snowdrops here at Welford Park were planted by the Norman monks to decorate their Church for the feast of Candlemas, and also for medicinal use. Not to be missed if in the area between 1st February to 5th March! (closed Mondays and Tuesdays).

welfordpark.co.uk


Wickham House

Wickham House is an exceptionally beautiful Georgian property, formerly the rectory to St Swithun’s, the historically important church which lies within its grounds. Elaborately ornamented in the late 19C in the style of Victorian Gothic by resident rector, it is set in 52 acres of parkland with stunning views over the neighbouring countryside, and offers myriad possibilities for marquee-based events - both corporate and private.
Wickham is licensed for civil ceremonies, both in the barn and in the walled garden, and they hold a premises license which allows live music until midnight and recorded music until 3am. They only host a maximum of 8 weekend marquee based events per annum, whilst the stunning oak-framed barn is available throughout the year for corporate off-sites.

wickhamhouse.com


Avebury Stone Circles

Dating back more than 4,000 years to Neolithic times, three monumental stone circles stand around the Wiltshire village of Avebury. The largest of these – the biggest prehistoric stone circle in the world – partially encloses the village itself, and the nearby Alexander Keiller Museum tells the story of the site’s 20th-century excavations. And unlike at Stonehenge, visitors are welcome to wander among the mysterious sarsen-stone monoliths.

nationaltrust.org.uk/avebury